Chisora Looks to Get Back On Track Against Janjanin

chisora

chisora

Dereck Chisora (25-6, 17 KOs) returns to the ring on September 10 with an eight-round contest against Drazan Janjanin (13-7, 12 KOs) at the Hovet in Stockholm.

The former British, Commonwealth and European Champion is the latest addition to a stacked card in the Swedish capital topped by the female grudge match between domestic rivals Mikaela Laurén and Klara Svensson.

Chisora missed out on a second reign as European Champion in May, losing via split decision to Pulev, but having regrouped, the British boxer and his team will attempt to launch another title assault, starting with a keep-busy contest against the big punching Bosnian Janjanin.

‘’This is the fight game,’’ said Chisora. ‘’If you lose, you have to rebuild and come back. I lost a close fight to Pulev, but I’m still in a good position. I want a rematch, but let’s see if they give it to me. Either way, there are a lot big fights out there for me, and I’m ready to fight anyone.’’

The 32 year-old says he is looking forward to fighting in Stockholm, having never visited the city before, and will be ringside supporting local fighter Anthony Yigit and watching the main event unfold as Laurén and Svensson battle it out for the interim WBC Female World Welterweight title.

‘’I’m excited to be fighting to Sweden,’’ he says. ‘’This will be my first time in Stockholm, but I’ve heard it’s a great place. That is one of the good things about working with a big promoter like Team Sauerland – you get to fight all over Europe, and that’s one of the reasons I wanted to sign with them.

‘’They’ve also got my boy Anthony ‘Can You Dig It’ Yigit on the card. I look forward to watching his fight, and the main event. I love women’s boxing, and I think it’s a great thing to have two female fighters headlining a big show.’’

Fury vs Chisora II to be Carried by AWE

Chisora vs Fury
The fight, which will be staged at the Phones 4u Arena in Manchester, England, will televised live and exclusively in the United States on AWE–A Wealth of Entertainment.
The two top-ten heavyweights met almost three years ago to the day (July 23, 2011) in a bout that saw Fury win a hotly contested unanimous decision.  Fast forward three years and there is some serious bad blood as both Fury and Chisorahave professed tremendous disdain for each other and each is vowing a knockout.
To add to the animosity, the European, British and WBO International Heavyweight titles will all be on the line.  Maybe most importantly this bout is a final eliminator for the number-one spot in the WBO and gives the winner a crack at unified world Heavyweight champion Wladimir Klitschko.
“We are ecstatic to bring this five-star fight to the fans of the United States”, said AWE CEO Robert Herring.  “This fight has so many story lines that range from the great first fight to two guys that really dislike each other to the belts and of course a shot at Klitschko.  There will be a winner in the ring but the big winners will be the fans of the United States who will get to witness this can’t miss Heavyweight fight on AWE,”.
Chisora of London already has had a taste of a world title opportunity but he came up short when he put up a courageous effort against then-WBC champion Vitali Klitschko in 2012.
He established himself as a Heavyweight contender by winning his first thirteen bouts with wins over the like of Sam Sexton (7-0 & 13-1) plus Mike Tyson conqueror, Danny Williams (41-8).  He won the British Heavyweight title with win over Williams and that put him in line to face fellow undefeated Fury.
After that great fight, Chisora took on a murderers’ row of opponents that sawChisora lose a controversial decision to undefeated Rober Helenius (16-0).  Chisora won in the court of public opinion as his performance against Helenius  facilitated a shot at Klitschko.  Chisora was as competitive as any recent Klitschko opponent but he dropped a unanimous decision to the longtime Ukrainian champion.  In his next bout he was stopped for the only time in his career by former two-division world champion David Haye.
Chisora has been undeterred as he has won five bouts in a row against top competition.  He captured the WBO International title with a 6th round stoppage over Malik Scott (35-0-1).  He won the European title with a 5th round stoppage of Edmund Gerber (23-1).  Dereck won the WBA International title with a 3rd-round destruction of Ondrej Pala (32-3).  In his last bout he scored a 12-round unanimous decision over former world title challenger Kevin Johnson (29-4-1) on February 15.
Fury of Manchester, England has become a lightning rod for controversy and in the process, his fights have become must-see television.
The 6’9″ behemoth has been groomed to become an heir apparent in the Heavyweight division and has scored big wins over Marcel Zeller (21-3), Scott Velshaw (10-1). He won the English title with a 10-round unanimous decision over John McDermott (25-5) and then stopped him 9 rounds in the rematch.
Fury continued on a path of destruction as beat undefeated foes and quality opposition such as Rich Power (12-0),  Marcelo Nascimento (13-0), Chisora (14-0), Neven Pajic (16-0), Martin Rigan (14-2), Vinny Maddalone (35-7) & Johnson (28-2-1).
Fury showed his heart and determination when he was dropped hard in the 2nd round by two-time Cruiserweight champion Steve Cunningham (25-5).  Fury was down on the scorecards but cameback to score a 7th round stoppage in Fury’s American debut at the Theater at Madison Square Garden.
Fury was twice scheduled to fight Haye but the former two-division champ had to pull out both times with injuries.
That kept Fury on the sidelines for 10-months until he came back on February 15and took out American Joey Abell (29-7) in four rounds.
Chisora vs Fury

Flanagan: “Gethin Thinks He Will Get Me In the Later Rounds, But He’s Got Another Thing Coming”

After a top grade five and a half year pro apprenticeship, boxing fans should finally discover whether Manchester lightweight Terry Flanagan has the tools and fortitude to cut it in major title class next weekend.

The 25 year old southpaw has already bagged Prizefighter and English titles whilst running up a perfect 24 fight slate (eight stoppages).

On Saturday 26th July on the mega promotion at Manchester’s Phones 4u Arena, ‘Turbo Terry’ faces off with Walsall’s battle hardened Martin Gethin in what could evolve into a mini boxer vs scrapper classic.

Tickets and VIP packages are available through Eventim on 0844 249 1000 or eventim.co.uk

Watch the whole action packed card – headed by Fury-Chisora, also featuring Billy Joe Saunders challenging for the vacant European middleweight title, plus title action involving stars Liam Smith and Liam Walsh – tune into BoxNation, the Channel of Champions (Sky Ch.437 (HD490)/Sky Ch.546). Join at www.boxnation.com

Glynn Evans caught up with Flanagan ahead of his big night.

Why does nobody want to fight Terry Flanagan?
Because he’s a tricky, strong, awkward southpaw who always comes to fight.

You won and retained the English title back in 2012. You beat good men such as Derry Mathews and Gary Sykes to win a Prizefighter competition also in 2012, and stopped ex world champion Nate Campbell in 2013. How long have you been ready for a major title fight?
For a good while. I was ready a year ago probably, but I’m even more ready now. I’m more of a man strength wise than I was this time last year and I’ve had more 12 round spars with quality people, guys like Kevin Mitchell, Ricky Burns and Gary Sykes. Anyone and everyone.

(Did they bash you up?!) Did they heck. I do the bashing!
It’s been frustrating but I’m here now, fighting for the British title on a huge show in my home town so I don’t want to dwell negatively on the past.

Ex amateur opponent Paul Butler won the IBF World Bantamweight world title last month. Were you surprised that he went on to achieve that?
I think we fought three times in total. I beat him and was robbed twice (laughs!). It was a long, long time ago. We were only about 11 or 12 and have both gone on to do well. I certainly knew he was a good kid; a neat, tidy boxer.
I wasn’t surprised that Paul beat Stuey Hall that night. He’s a quality fighter.

Initially you were primed to challenge Liverpool’s Derry Mathews – an able and established champion – for the British title. From your part, was it a good thing or a bad thing when he withdrew and left you to contest the vacant title?
I’d rather have won the title off Derry. He’s a bigger name than Martin and beating him in style would really have put me up there.
Derry says he was injured but I heard that he might be lined up for a European title shot. I think he knew if he defended against me, it’d be the end for him. If I come through this, who knows, we might still do it. I’m not too fussed.

In what ways have you needed to modify your training schedule to accommodate replacement Martin Gethin at short notice?
Well, I think Derry would’ve tried to box me whereas Martin will come for a fight. So it’s been a case of getting my sparring partners to be aggressive and have a war. I prefer it when the opponent comes to have a ‘tear-up’. It’s far easier for me to get my boxing off.

You’re yet to travel past round ten and Martin notoriously finishes strongly over the 12 round course. Is that a worry? What precautions have you taken to prepare yourself for a hard distance fight?
I know everyone says that sparring is different but I’ve been training for 12 round fights for years now. I’m confident in my condition to do the distance easily. I’ve done it in the gym many times. I’m a young, strong, fit lad, aren’t I?
I don’t think Martin increases his work rate. He just maintains his output while some of his opposition has tired. I won’t.

What’s your assessment of Gethin? Have you fought anyone similar? What have you identified as his qualities and shortcomings?
Martin’s definitely a fit lad who always comes to fight but he doesn’t have the best boxing ability and can’t change much. I’ve sparred plenty similar. You always know what you are getting. He’s pretty basic.
He just walks forward and tries to swarm the opposition but I’ll walk him onto big shots. He probably thinks that he’ll start to get to me in the later rounds. He’s got another thing coming!

You’re debuting at 12 round championship level, against arguably your toughest opponent, before your home fans. A lot of pressure!
Nah, fighting at home, having loads rooting for me, will be a big advantage. I’ve sold about 250 tickets. When that bell goes there’s only me and him in the ring.
I’m excited, not daunted. Can’t wait. Almost there!

How do you anticipate the fight unfolding and why are you confident that you win?
I’d prefer to finally do the 12 rounds and I’ve definitely prepared for that but I think I’m going to knock him out. Don’t get me wrong, I’m expecting it to be very hard but I’ll walk him onto shots and I punch harder than he does.
I know he’s got more stoppages but that’s cos he wears ‘em down, then gets to ‘em. My power has improved a lot over the last 12 months. Either way, dance or fight, I beat Gethin.

Domestically, lightweight is a fabulous division with top quality fighters with some potentially great defences ahead if you can triumph on Saturday week!
Definitely but I’m not about to start shouting people out. They’re all great fighters. I’d say that lightweight is the best division in Britain at the moment and it’d be easy to get up for fights against any of those that you’ve mentioned.

Ultimately, how far can you go?
You know, when I started out as a kid, all I ever wanted was a British title. But as you progress and develop, your ambitions and goals change. Hopefully, one day, I’ll get to fight for a world title. I definitely think I’m good enough.

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