Khan, Algieri, Malignaggi & O’Connor Chime In On Mayweather vs Pacquiao Predictions

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BROOKLYN (April 29, 2015) – Boxing superstar Amir “King” Khan (30-3, 19 KOs) returns to the ring on May 29 to take on former world champion Chris Algieri (20-1, 8 KOs) at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, NY, as the headliner of an exciting Premier Boxing Champions (PBC) card on Spike TV.
 
Opening up the televised action, which is set to begin at 9 p.m. ET/PT, will be the return of Brooklyn’s own two-time world champion Paulie Malignaggi (33-6, 7KO’s) as he faces Boston’s Danny O’Connor (25-2, 9KO’s) in a 10-round welterweight attraction.   

With the Mayweather vs. Pacquiao welterweight championship showdown just days away, Khan, Algieri, Malignaggi and O’Connor gave their take on how the most anticipated fight of this era will go down.
 
Amir Khan:  “This is a fight that the world has been wanting to see for so long and it’s great that it is now upon us. Floyd and Manny are two legendary fighters and it is only right that we get to see them share the ring together. I have no doubt that this is going to be a tremendous matchup and will be extremely exciting for as long as it lasts. Manny has hand speed and fast feet that will cause Floyd some problems early on, but as it progresses I expect Floyd to make the adjustments he tends to make to counter that before pulling away on the scorecards. Both fighters still have so much to give and on Saturday night I’m sure they’re going to produce something very special for the fans.”
 
Chris Algieri: “Styles make fights and I believe this is a style that suits Floyd. Floyd is the smartest fighter in the game. He will be able to pick up on certain flaws and exploit them. Manny is going to make him work in there and I believe that the first few rounds are going to be very interesting. Manny is a different and smarter fighter than he was before the Marquez knockout. If Manny comes in shape the way that he did against me, and if Floyd has missed a step at all, then I see Pacquiao giving him all kinds of trouble. Ultimately though, I see Mayweather winning a decision.”
 
Paulie Malignaggi: “I am taking Mayweather by wide decision or a late-round stoppage. He has too much variation to his arsenal. Pacquiao is fun to watch, but his one-dimensional approach won’t be enough on Saturday night.”
 
Danny O’Connor: “I am going with Mayweather. He is too smart to fall into anyone’s game plan, other than his own. I predict a decision based off of his superior boxing ability.”
 
Tickets for the live event on May 29 at Barclays Center, promoted by DiBella Entertainment and Star Boxing, are priced at $250, $150, $75 and $45, not including applicable service charges and taxes, and are on sale now. Tickets are available at www.barclayscenter.com, www.ticketmaster.com and at the American Express Box Office at Barclays Center. To charge by phone, call Ticketmaster at (800) 745-3000. For group tickets, please call 800-GROUP-BK.
 
The televised action begins on Spike at 9 pm ET/6 p.m. PT. Doors at Barclays Center open at 6 p.m. ET.

Shawn Porter to Defend Title vs Kell Brook August 16

LAS VEGAS (July 12, 2014)-Golden Boy Promotions and SHOWTIME® will deliver another explosive night of boxing from the renowned StubHub Center in Carson, Calif., when undefeated IBF Welterweight World Champion Shawn “Showtime” Porter (24-0-1, 15 KOs), of Akron, Ohio defends his belt against fellow unbeaten British star Kell Brook (32-0, 22 KOs), of Sheffield, England, on Saturday, Aug. 16, headlining a three world championship fight SHOWTIME CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING® telecast.

In co-featured fights on the telecast, undefeated Omar “Panterita” Figueroa (23-0-1, 17 KOs), of Weslaco, Texas, risks his WBC Lightweight World Championship for a second time against mandatory challenger Daniel “Tremendo” Estrada (32-2-1, 24 KOs), of Mexico City, and WBC Super Middleweight World Champion Sakio “The Scorpion” Bika (32-5-3, 21 KOs), of Sydney, Australia, will defend against unbeaten Anthony “The Dog” Dirrell (26-0-1, 22 KOs), of Flint, Mich., in a rematch of a wildly exciting and controversial 12-round split draw last Dec. 7.

“From the championship fight between Shawn Porter and Kell Brook, to Omar Figueroa’s defense of his lightweight title against Daniel Estrada, to the rematch that fans demanded between Sakio Anthony Dirrell, Golden Boy Promotions continues to deliver on the promise of a simple premise – bringing the best fights to fans of boxing,” said Oscar De La Hoya, President and Founder of Golden Boy Promotions. “The StubHub Center’s reputation as the home to some of the best fights in boxing is only growing, and we’re proud to put on three more great fights that will only help cement that reputation.”

Tickets priced at $150, $75, $50 and $25, plus applicable taxes, fees and services charges and will be available online atAXS.com, by phone at 888-9-AXS-TIX (888-929-7849) and at StubHub Center Box Office (Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. PT to 6 p.m. PT). VIP Suites are available by calling 877-604-8777. For more information on group discounts or VIP packages, please call 877-234-8425.

Unorthodox offensive machine, Porter, 26, will be making the second defense of the 147-pound belt he won in a close but clear upset 12-round unanimous decision over big favorite Devon Alexander “The Great” last Dec. 7. In his lone defense, Porter overwhelmed former two-division world champion Paulie Malignaggi, via ruthless fourth-round TKO last April 19 from Washington, D.C. Strong, fast, confident and physically gifted, Porter scored two knockdowns against Malignaggi while appearing to seriously hurt him throughout. He ended the one-sided bout with a clean right hand. The bout was stopped at 1:13 of the fourth round.

Regarding his upcoming defense, Porter, an amateur standout before turning professional in October 2008, said: “I think I have the edge on Brook with everything. I’m faster than he is, stronger than he is, quicker than he is, more athletic, and if you put all that in one fight, I’m going to be the winner.”

The world title fight has been a long time coming for Brook, 28, a power-punching, upright fighter who has been a mandatory contender for some time and was supposed to challenge Alexander three times during his reign only for the fights to be called off due to injuries. Then, Porter outpointed Alexander.

“I’m confident I’m going to win. I’m planning on bringing Porter’s belt to the United Kingdom with me,” said Brook, who is coming off a tougher than expected eighth-round knockout over Mexican welterweight champion Alvaro Robles last March 15. “I am fitter than ever and ready to go. I have been in training for a long time, so August 16 it’s the perfect date for me.”

Figueroa, 24, captured the then-vacant WBC 135-pound crown on a unanimous 12-round decision over Nihito Arakawa in a brutal slugfest that stole the show July 7, 2013, on SHOWTIME. Figueroa, despite fighting with a cut on his nose from an accidental headbutt, registered two knockdowns in a memorable slugfest in which 2,112 total punches were delivered in 36 minutes of non-stop action.

In his lone defense, the offensive-minded, crowd-pleasing Figueroa retained his crown with a 12-round split decision over amateur nemesis and fellow Texan, Jerry “The Corpus Christi Kid” Belmontes,last April 26 at StubHub Center on SHOWTIME. Figueroa was victorious in a puncher versus boxer matchup by the scores of 118-110, 116-112 and 113-115.

Estrada, 29, who’ll be making his SHOWTIME and United States debut, has campaigned exclusively in Mexico. He’s won nine consecutive fights, five by way of knockout. At 5-feet-10 ½, he is three inches taller than Figueroa.

Estrada won the WBC Silver Lightweight Championship with a sixth-round TKO over Isaias Sampaio on April 19, 2013. Before that, Estrada scored a 10th-round technical decision over Arakawa in a match stopped after the 10th after Estrada could not continue due to a swollen right eye that was caused by an unintentional headbutt.

Unbeaten since losing a split 12-round decision to Reyes Sanchez in a scrap for the vacant WBC Silver Light Welterweight Title on Sept. 11, 2010, Estrada is coming off a third-round knockout over Hugo Armenta last Dec. 14.

Bika, 35, is no stranger to winning hard-fought, tough, tight, world title fights. He won the then-vacant WBC 168-pound belt with a 12-round majority decision over Marco Antonio Periban (116-112, 115-113 and 114-114) on June 22, 2013, on SHOWTIME and then boxed to a split decision draw (114-112, 110-116 and 113-113) against Dirrell despite getting floored in the fifth and losing a point for a low blow in the 11th round.

A 2000 Olympian for his native Cameroon, Bika felt he deserved the decision against Dirrell and took exception with the penalty for a punch the referee ruled south of the border.

“I feel I was fighting the referee as well,” Bika said. “The body shot was a legitimate shot. Not below the belt line. I got him on the belt line, Dirrell just wanted to milk it. I was the busier fighter and now I just want to fight the best ahead of me.”

While Bika was going 12 rounds for the ninth time, it was the first time Dirrell had gone past eight. Still, the younger brother of 2004 U.S. Olympic Bronze medalist and former world title challenger Anthony Dirrell was positive that he’d done enough to triumph. Upon hearing the verdict, a visibly upset Dirrell bolted from the ring.

“I want to apologize to the fans for leaving the ring like that, but I was just disappointed,” a frustrated Dirrell told SHOWTIME’s Jim Gray a few minutes later. “He hit low and head butted. I definitely want a rematch.”

Dirrell’s career has twice been seriously jeopardized; the first time in December 2006 when he was diagnosed with cancer and was sidelined for 20 months and again in May 2012 when he was involved in a motorcycle accident and suffered a broken lower left leg and left wrist. At the time he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma, Dirrell was 12-0 and had been boxing professionally for only two years.

A victory over Bika would cap a remarkable journey, and Dirrell is confident it will happen in the rematch.

“This fight has been on my mind since I heard the decision from our first fight,” he said. “I’m just real excited to get it. I know I can beat Bika, I know I have what it takes and that’s what it is. It just takes hard work and dedication to stay focused on the game plan.

“I could have done better the first fight. I don’t feel like he was hitting me with more shots than I was hitting him with, but I still think I won it. This time it will be convincing.”

Hopkins Wants Stevenson, Porter Annihilates Malignaggi, Jacobs Calls Out Quillin.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 20, 2014) – Bernard “The Alien” Hopkins (55-6-2, 32 KOs), at 49-years-old, made history once again on Saturday night. He is now the oldest man to unify a boxing world championship and the oldest fighter to defend a world title-besting his own record-as he defeated Beibut Shumenov (14-2, 9 KOs) via split decision to become the Unified Light Heavyweight World Champion. Judges Dave Moretti and Jerry Roth scored the fight 116-111 for the future Hall of Famer while Gustavo Padilla scored the bout 114-113 for Shumenov.

In the co-feature bouts, Shawn “Showtime” Porter (24-0-1, 14 KOs) overwhelmed Paulie “Magic Man” Malignaggi (33-6, 7 KOs) to remain undefeated and retain his IBF Welterweight World Championship with an impressive fourth-round TKO over the veteran fighter. Peter “Kid Chocolate” Quillin (31-0, 22 KOs) retained his WBO Middleweight World Championship with a unanimous decision win over Lukas Konecny (50-5, 23 KOs) in a fight controlled by “Kid Chocolate.”

The event, promoted by Golden Boy Promotions, took place at the DC Armory in Washington, D.C.

Boxing’s elder statesman, Hopkins was calm and confident throughout the fight, enforcing ring generalship against Shumenov who was never able to figure out a game plan to score. Shumenov, who is self-trained, threw very few combinations, and did not press the pace. Hopkins, on the other hand, dazzled with his timing, counterpunching and, at times, showmanship. In the 11 th round, Hopkins landed a short right hand that sent Shumenov to the canvas for the fifth time in his career.

After the judges scores were read, SHOWTIME ringside reporter Jim Gray asked Hopkins what he thought of the split decision. He responded, “Listen, when you get into all that about the judges and all that stuff, they go to school. They have commissions to regulate all that. I don’t like to get into all of that. It’s not my job to deal with that. It’s my job to get ready and to unify the championship before 50.”

When Gray asked about his legacy, Hopkins compared himself to another boxing great. “I describe my legacy like a Joe Frazier. We get knocked down but we get back up. I’ll let the historians analyze and debate over the years as I grow a deeper gray beard watching soap operas. I’ll let them break down my legacy.”

On his future, Hopkins said, “We are with SHOWTIME until I end my career. Stevenson, I am coming to Canada. I am getting my papers together. I want to be the undisputed light heavyweight world champion this year, period.” A disappointed Shumenov told Gray, “To be honest, I wasn’t thinking about the scorecard. I tried hard. Bernard, but he was the better man tonight. I chose the wrong strategy and used the wrong style. I am angry that I couldn’t get the victory. I am a true warrior and I want to fight only the best. Tonight, obviously it wasn’t my fight.”

In the middle fight of the three fight SHOWTIME telecast, Porter rushed Malignaggi right from the opening bell and opened up a cut on Malignaggi’s cheek in the first round. In the second round, Malignaggi was clearly hurt by a leaping left hook from the champion.

Early in the fourth, Porter threw a powerful right hand to the temple, dropping Malignaggi for the fourth time in his career. While Malignaggi gamely continued, he was clearly hurt. Porter closed the show with a barrage of punches that sent Malignaggi down again and forced referee Sam Williams to wave waved off the fight without a count at 1:14 of round four.

In the aftermath, Gray asked Porter what it was that Malignaggi had told him just moments after the bout. “Paulie, wished me the best and I don’t know what he is looking at for himself [in the future] but he said, ‘Make sure they know that I lost to a great champion. Go out there and be great.’ I am going to honor his words and his wishes.”

Speaking about the win, Porter said, “I definitely needed this victory. To get it like that from a guy like this. He touched me in every way possible being in the ring with him. I knew what he was coming with. But I always had questions of my own. I came in and answered those questions tonight.”

When asked what he wants next, Porter said, “I’m going to enjoy this and let my team handle what is next. I’m sure they will all communicate. We’ll come up with the next game plan and we’ll tackle it.”

Gray then asked Malignaggi what it was that he told Porter. “I just said, ‘Don’t make me have lost to an average fighter. Go be great so that I can say that a really great fighter beat me.’ I know that he has that potential.

Regarding retirement, “If I do retire, and I don’t want to make that decision right now while I am emotional, but I don’t want to do it off of an average champion. I want to do it off of a great champion.

Breaking down the fight, Malignaggi said, “He was controlling the distance. I couldn’t get going. He was going away and then bringing the attack. He mixed it up well. He came right at me at times and then, at other times, he moved away.”

When asked about retiring and focusing the rest of his career solely on his commentating work for SHOWTIME, Malignaggi said, “I can’t really think about that right now. If I give you an answer right now I would tell you that I am stopping fighting but maybe I’d change my mind next week. I want to go home and think about it.”

Quillin, who implemented his game plan from the first round, was the stronger, quicker and more effective fighter. While Konecny never appeared to be in jeopardy of going down, he wasn’t able to adjust to Quillin’s style and won 2 just rounds combined on the three judges’ scorecards. The scores were 120-108 and 119-109, twice.

After the fight, Quillin said, “I’m thankful that I was able to get up in here with a tough customer in front of me and get up and fight.”

SHOWTIME EXTREME® Results: Sadam Ali (18-0, 11 KOs) defeated Michael Clark (44-9-1, 18 KOs) via a first-round knockout (2:06) in a scheduled 10-round welterweight bout.

Marcus Browne (9-0, 7 KOs) defeated Otis Griffin (24-15-2, 10 KOs) in an 8-round light heavyweight bout via unanimous decision. All three judges scored the fight 80-71.

Zachary Ochoa (6-0, 3 KOs) defeated Hector Marengo (6-7-4, 4 KOs) via TKO due to the request of Marengo’s corner to end the scheduled 6-round junior welterweight bout.

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