Tony Luis Hands Karl Dargan First Career Loss. Captures WBC Continental Americas Lightweight Championship  

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Lightning Luis
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

The much-anticipated main event featured Philadelphian Karl “Dynamite” Dargan (17-1, 9 KOs)* against Tony “The Lightning” Luis (28-5, 18 KOs) for the WBC Continental Americas Lightweight Championship.

The first round started slow with both fighters feeling each other out. Luis appeared to control the second round keeping Dynamite on the ropes. Dargan was down in the third and the referee ruled it a slip. Luis continued to be the aggressor in the fourth. Dargan began to return fire late in the fourth and Luis thew a punch after the bell that enraged Dynamite.

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Dargan and Luis
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

Tony continued to throw bunches of punches to start the fifth including an aggressive body attack. In the later rounds Luis continued to be the aggressor keeping Dargan up against the ropes. Dargan suffered an injury to his left eye in eighth round but the doctor deemed him okay to continue to the ninth round.

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Luis and Dargan
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events
 

Dynamite landed a hard shot in the tenth but Luis countered and knocked down Dargan. He managed to finish the fight but, unfortunately, the cards were not in his favor. Tony Luis won via unanimous decision with the final score 97-92, 99-90 and 97-92 and handed Dynamite his first career loss.

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Lacy and Barrera
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

In the middle fight of the telecast, Cuban sensation Sullivan Barrera (15-0, 10 KOs) stopped veteran Jeff “Left Hook” Lacy (27-6 18 KOs). Barrera knocked Lacy to the canvas in the first round but he managed to recover and finish the round.

Both fighters settled in by the third round. However, it was short lived because in the fourth round Lacy could no longer withstand Barrera’s attack and the referee stopped the fight with Lacy still on his feet.

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Lamour and Falowo
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

The live ESPN2 Friday Night Fights telecast began with an eight round battle for the New England Middleweight Championship between Thomas “The Souljah” Falowo (13-3, 8 KOs) of Pawtucket, Rhode Island and Russell “The Haitian Sensation” Lamour (11-1, 5 KOs) of Portland Maine. The Foxwoods’ crowd was fired up from the beginning for this local showdown. These fighters were not strangers as they had faced each other several times as amateurs. They took no time to feel each other out and came out swinging from the first bell.

Falowo, who only has one amateur win against Lamour, was clearly the aggressor in the early rounds. By the sixth round, Falowo started to tire and Lamour took advantage of his fatigue, but Falowo managed to end strong.

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Lamour and Falowo
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

The seventh round was uncharted territory for both competitors. Prior to the fight Falowo said the later rounds would be the difference-maker for him. He continued to put the pressure on Lamour in the seventh round.

In the eighth and final round Falowo looked determined to secure a knockout. By the end of the fight the crowd was on their feet at Foxwoods and Lamour and Falowo were both trading big shots.

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Falowo and His Corner
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

Falowo walked away with the unanimous decision victory and the New England Middleweight Championship with scores of 78-74 and 77-75 (twice). He also handed Lamour his first professional defeat and only his second victory over “The Haitian Sensation.”

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Foster and Pryor
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

In the first fight of the night to go the distance, local light heavyweight Charles “The Truth” Foster (7-0, 3 KOs) defeated Washington, DC native Larry Pryor (9-9, 5 KOs) via unanimous decision. The bout was six rounds and the judges scores were: 60-54, 59-55 and 60-54 in favor of Foster.

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Mosley Jr. and Machado
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

Middleweights Shane Mosley, Jr. (3-1, 3 KOs) and Rafael “The Penguin” Machado (0-3) were scheduled for four rounds of action. However, Mosley, Jr. knocked down Machado twice in the third before the referee stopped the fight.

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Mosley Sr., Mosley, Jr., and Mayweather, Sr.
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

Working Mosley, Jr.’s corner were his father “Sugar” Shane Mosley and Floyd Mayweather, Sr.

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Oltmanns and Tapia
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

Heavyweight Keith “Machine Gun” Tapia (13-0, 8 KOs) of Santurce, Puerto Rico stopped Jesse “Street Fighter” Oltmanns (10-5, 7 KOs) of Bartonsville, PA in the first round in the second bout on the card. 

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Whitmore and Reyes
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

In the first fight of the evening, Philadelphia’s Khalib “Big Foot” Whitmore (6-1, 5 KOs) squared off against Carlos Reyes of Kuarny, AZ (7-5-1, 5 KOs). Reyes knocked Whitmore down twice in the second before the referee called the fight to an end at 56 seconds into the second round handing Whitmore his first career defeat. 

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Wilson and Rodriguez
Photo Credits: David Spagnolo/Main Events

In the final bout of the evening, David Wilson (5-0, 1 KO) of New Haven, Connecticut knocked out Michael “The Reason” Rodriguez (0-3) of New York, New York in the final round of the four-round middleweight swing bout. 

Cassius Chaney’s bout was cancelled after his scheduled opponent failed a medical exam and a replacement could not be found in time. 

*Note: All records have been updated to reflect tonight’s results.
 
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Forgotten Legends: Francisco “Panchito” Bojado

By: Steve Gallegos

There have been many top notch fighters who come out of the amatuer ranks and are expected to do big things upon turning professional. For some fighters, the spotlight is too bright and they eventually fold under pressure. This was the case with former top prospect Francisco Panchito Bojado.

Bojado was an all action boxer-puncher who made a name for himself in the early 2000’s. Bojado was born in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico and he had an outstanding amateur record of 168-15 and represented Mexico in the 2000 summer olympics in Sydney, Australia. He turned pro in early 2001, signing with veteran boxing manager Shelley Finkel, who was able to ink Bojado a huge deal with Main Events and Showtime. 2001 would be a great year for Bojado as he would win his first nine bouts, all by KO. He was being showcased on televised cards alongside fellow top amatuer standouts Juan Diaz and Rocky Juarez.

It was in his ninth pro bout in which he would get his first real taste of national exposure. He met veteran Mauro Lucero on 11/03/2001 at the MGM Grand Garden in Las Vegas, NV. It was the co-feature for the much anticipated battle between Kostya Tszyu and Zab Judah. Bojado didn’t disappoint on the big stage as he destroyed Lucero in the first round. Bojado was amongst the top prospects in boxing and was even being called the next Oscar De La Hoya; however reality would hit Bojado hard.

2002 started off very badly for “Panchito” as he dropped a 10 round unanimous decison to journeyman Juan Carlos Rubio. Bojado’s conditioning was a major factor in this fight as he lost 25 pounds in 4 weeks, which caused him to run out of gas early in the fight. It was a learning experience for Bojado and he continued to fight on, winning his next three fights; however the performances were dull and Bojado appeared to lack passion and desire. Changes needed to be made and they were.

In mid 2003, Bojado hired famed trainer Floyd Mayweather Sr. who had helped resurrect Oscar De La Hoya’s career after his loss to Shane Mosley. Bojado was clearly a different fighter when he met veteran Lemuel Nelson on 08/09/03 in Miami, FL. Bojado boxed beautifully throughout the bout, using his jab to setup combinations and won a convincing 10 round unanimous decision. He would close out 2003 with another convincing decision win, getting revenge in a rematch with Juan Carlos Rubio. He would win his next two fights impressively including a win over veteran Emmanuel Clottey; however his career would be met with another roadblock.

He met former world champion and seasoned veteran Jesse James Leija on 07/24/04 in Atlantic City, NJ. It was a close, exciting fight in which Bojado put Leija down in the second; however Leija’s experience and ring smarts would be the difference in this fight and Bojado would lose a close 10 round split decision. Bojado would then fall off the radar completely, not fighting for nearly three years.

In 2007, he signed with Golden Boy Promotions and joined Oscar De La Hoya’s training camp in Puerto Rico, training with the “Golden Boy” in preperation for De La Hoya’s mega showdown with Floyd Mayweather. Bojado would return to the ring in 2007 and would win two bouts before losing a 10 round split decision to Steve Forbes in October,2007. It would be the last fight Bojado would have.

Bojado would face trouble outside the ring in 2011 as he was involved in a high speed chase with police after he failed to stop while passing through the Mexican/U.S. border. He hasn’t been in the ring since 2007; however he stated in a 2013 interview that he was back in training and was making a comeback. His boxing record to date stands at 18-3 with 12 KO’s. He’s another story of what could have been. Was the pressure too much for him? Did issues outside the ring affect him inside the ring? He’s only 30 years old; maybe there is something left in him where he can finish what he started.

Bojado-Forbes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mayweather: “My Dad Said to Rest in training & He Was Right”

FLOYD MAYWEATHER SR will be out to show he’s the daddy this weekend.
 
He recently returned as the head trainer for his son, Floyd Jr who defends his WBC welterweight title against Robert Guerrero in Las Vegas on Saturday night, live and exclusive on BoxNation (Sky Ch. 437/Virgin Ch. 546).
 
Mayweather Jr had been trained by his uncle Roger who is expected to be in the corner at the MGM Grand Garden along with his brother and cutsman Rafael Garcia, but won’t be giving the orders.
 
Mayweather Jr said: “There are certain things my dad sees, and he only wants the best for me.”
 
The unbeaten American, 36, hasn’t boxed since a hard fought points win against Miguel Cotto 12 months ago, a performance that perhaps help persuade him to team up with his father.
 
Mayweather Jr added: “I don’t want to make the same mistakes I did for the Cotto fight, where I over-trained.
 
“I have had more rest than I did for the Cotto fight. It was all training and sparring which is wear and tear on the body.
 
“I shouldn’t have made the mistakes I did in that fight and against Guerrero I will be better than what I was in the Cotto fight.
 
My dad has said; ‘Look, you need the rest in training and you’ll look better.’ He was right.
 
“Any athlete competing at the highest level has to rest his body.”