Edner Cherry Plans to Take Frustrations Out on Jerry Belmontes

image

Philadelphia, PA–He has not lost a fight since 2008, but junior lightweight contender Edner Cherry remains a fighter in limbo.

Few fighters understand frustration like Cherry, who gets a long-overdue nationally televised 10-round fight against Jerry Belmontes on Oct. 18 at the 2300 Arena in South Philadelphia. It will mark Cherry’s second fight in 2014 and only his third in the last 20 month.

The Cherry-Belmontes bout and the Steve Cunningham-Natu Visinia heavyweight 10-rounder will be televised live by NBCSN over its popular Fight Night series beginning at 9pm (ET).
 
“Some of the previous people I signed with…I was not sure why they could not move me,” said Cherry, who is ranked No.11 by the IBF, No. 17 by the WBC. “They were saying that no one wants to fight me or saying it was too hard to get me a fight, but this is boxing and getting the right fight and getting your name out there is important.”
 
After his knockout win over Mexican contender Vicente Escobedo early in 2013 in Atlantic City, NJ, Cherry couldn’t get another fight even though he had not lost since dropping a 12-round decision to Timothy Bradley for the WBC junior welterweight (140 pounds) belt in 2008. Overall, he is 32-6-2, 17 K0s.
 
“There are so many guys who don’t want to fight, who are scared, and yet they are the ones who are getting all the matches,” Cherry said. “For me, it’s like…what is stopping me? I just won, c’mon, what’s going on, why am I on the shelf?”
 
When the Florida-based Cherry signed with promoter J Russell Peltz last November, he thought his luck would change. When the first fight possibilities turned out to be against solid, world-rated lightweights (135 pounds), new trainer Dan Birmingham insisted on something easier and someone lighter, as in junior lightweight (130 pounds).
 
 
 
“I don’t think there is a junior lightweight in the world who can hang with Edner,” Birmingham said. “I simply wanted him to stay at 130 and get in a tune-up since he had not fought since February of 2013.
 
When Cherry finally landed an April 4 fight at Temple University’s Liacouras Center in Philadelphia, more frustration followed. He earned an eight-round decision over rugged Robert Osiobe, of Las Vegas, but suffered a nasty cut over his left eye from a head butt late in the fight and that kept him out of action for the summer.
 
“Frustrating? Of course,” Cherry said. “I had just taken the rust off and I was back on the shelf.”
 
Cherry has been boxing since he was 14, but now, at 32, and after some career hindrances, he might be getting his chance to make an impact.
 
“People look at age and are concerned,” Cherry said. “Maybe speed might be sacrificed, but if you use the talent and experience that you have then it will take you a long ways. I’ve still got some time.”
 
Cherry thinks his time will come Oct 18 against Belmontes, a match he accepted at 134 pounds only because Belmontes, of Corpus Christi, TX, is not known as a big puncher, having scored only five knockouts on his 19-5 record.
 
“It is going to be the right fight for me because Belmontes has fought some great people,” Cherry said. “I do not have a pushover that night; I have to come prepared and I am.
 
“Belmontes is out of the box–he likes to fight in the pocket and sometimes the crowd really likes to watch a fight like that. The crowd does not want a boring fight, they want something exciting.”
 
If he can channel his frustration at the 2300 Arena, then the crowd may see the “Cherry Bomb” explode and finally make the impact he desires.

Tomoki Kameda Defends Bantamweight Title vs Alejandro Hernandez Nov. 1st on Showtime

NEW YORK (Oct. 2, 2014) – Undefeated WBO Bantamweight World Champion Tomoki “El Mexicanito” Kameda will make the third defense of his title against interim titlist and mandatory challenger Alejandro Hernandez on Saturday, Nov. 1, live on SHOWTIME® (9 p.m. ET/PT) in the co-feature of a SHOWTIME BOXING: Special Edition.  
 
In the main event of the tripleheader, popular light heavyweight contender Andrzej “Chicago’s Polish Prince” Fonfara  will return to his adopted hometown against experienced veteran Doudou Ngumbu in a 10-round light heavyweight showdown from UIC Pavilion at University of Illinois-Chicago.
 
In the opening bout of the telecast, undefeated super featherweight contender and former Interim WBA Featherweight World Champion Javier Fortuna will take on twice-beaten Puerto Rican Abner Cotto in a 10-round super featherweight bout.  The event, titled “The Homecoming,” is promoted by Warriors Boxing.
 
Chicago’s Fonfara, 26, a native of Warsaw, Poland, had won 13 in a row before a hard-fought loss to WBC Light Heavyweight World Champion Adonis Stevenson this past May in a thrilling battle on SHOWTIME.  A heavy underdog, Fonfara floored the champion in his hometown of Montreal in the ninth round in a showdown that was closer than most experts anticipated.   
 
Fonfara (25-3, 15 KOs) is now 15-1 with one no-contest since July 2008.  The WBC No. 6 contender at 175 pounds, Fonfara has defeated three former world title holders -Byron Mitchell (TKO 3), Glen Johnson (a clear 10-round decision in perhaps a career-best victory) and Gabriel Campillo (TKO 9) -in his last six starts.
 
Fonfara, who campaigned for much of his career at 168 pounds and below, has only lost once at light heavyweight, and that loss was to Stevenson, widely considered as the top fighter in the world at 175 pounds.  The 6-foot-2 Fonfara, who turns 27 three days after the showdown with Ngumbu, will return to Chicago for his eighth fight in his last nine starts. 
 
A boxer with superb stamina and surprising power, Fonfara’s iron chin allows him to outlast his opponents and come on in the later rounds of his fights.
 
The 32-year old Ngumbu, of Toulouse, France by way of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, will make his U.S. and North American debut.   Originally a soccer player, Ngumbu found boxing at age 18 and turned professional at 25.  The former African champion (33-5, 12 KOs) is vastly experienced, having fought 247 rounds to Fonfara’s 129. 
 
The 5-foot-11 Ngumbu is coming off a 10-round unanimous decision over Johnny Muller in June in Monte Carlo, Monaco, and has gone the 12-round distance six times since 2009.. 
 
Ngumbu holds a 2013 win over former world title challenger Vyacheslav Uzelkov, who lost in 2010 to then-WBA Light Heavyweight Champ Beibut Shumenov.  Ngumbu also has a 12-round unanimous decision win over Aleksy Kuziemski, who challenged Nathan Cleverly for the WBO Light Heavyweight World Title in 2011. 
 
Ngumbu’s long arms and fast hands allow him to come forward with an unorthodox but aggressive attack from unpredictable angles.  His tendency to keep his hands at his sides makes all of his fights exciting affairs.
 
Kameda (30-0, 19 KOs), of Tokyo,  Japan, is coming off a brutal 7th round knockout victory of former WBO Bantamweight Champ Pungluang Singyu in his U.S.. debut on July 12. 
 
The victory over Singyu was the biggest win of the 23-year-old’s career.  Singyu had formerly held the same championship belt until losing it to Paulus Ambunda in March 2013.  Ambunda lost his belt to Kameda in his first and only defense of the title last August via unanimous decision.   
 
Kameda and his two brothers, Koki and Daiki are among the most famous fighters in the history of Japanese boxing, and all three recently held world titles at the same time.  While Tomoki held the WBO Bantamweight Championship, Koki was the WBA Bantamweight Champion until he voluntarily relinquished the title in December in order to move down to flyweight, and Daiki was the IBF Junior Bantamweight Champion until he lost by decision last December.
 
Kameda moved to Mexico when he was 15 years old to learn an aggressive fighting style and quickly earned the Spanish nickname “El Mexicanito” (The Little Mexican).  A true boxer-puncher with extremely fast hands, Kameda continues to train in Mexico, but has since moved back to Japan where his family enjoys celebrity status.
 
Hernandez (28-10-2, 15 KOs), of Mexico City, won the vacant Interim WBO Bantamweight World Championship with a unanimous decision over countryman Daniel Rosas on June 14. 
 
The 28-year-old Hernandez has won three fights in a row at bantamweight and is a former world title challenger at 115 and 112 pounds.  Hernandez fought to a draw for the vacant WBO Super Flyweight Championship to then-undefeated Marvin Sonsona in 2009 and lost a unanimous decision to then-WBO Flyweight Champion and current WBO Super Flyweight kingpin Omar Andres Narvaez in 2008.
 
A fearless “do or die” slugger from the classic Mexican warrior mold, Hernandez comes forward relentlessly behind powerful combinations to the head and body.
 
Fortuna (25-0-1, 18 KOs), of Dominican Republic, is a former Interim WBA Featherweight World Champion – he won the vacant belt against previously undefeated Patrick Hyland in 2012.  The southpaw was set to defend his crown in April of 2013 against Miguel Zamudio but lost the title on the scales after failing to make weight.  He knocked Zamudio down twice en route to a devastating first round knockout and then gradually settled into the 130-pound division. 
 
Fortuna, 25, is coming off a 10-round unanimous decision over Juan Antonio Rodriguez on May 31 in Las Vegas and is just one fight removed from a knockout of former world title challenger Francisco Lorenzo. 
 
Fortuna, who is known for his explosive speed and highlight reel knockouts, only has one blemish on his record – a controversial draw against Luis Franco in August of 2013..
 
Cotto (18-2, 8 KOs), a relative of future Hall of Famer Miguel Cotto, was a top amateur in Puerto Rico – he won a silver medal at the 2007 Pan American Games and compiled a record of 235-20 before turning pro.
 
The 27-year-old Cotto is coming off a split-decision victory of Jerry Belmontes in August and his only two losses have come against top competition.  He lost to undefeated WBC 135-pound champ Omar Figueroa in a non-title bout in 2013 and to top 130-pound contender Francisco Vargas this past March. 
 
Additional bouts and the undercard will be announced shortly.

image

Tyrone Brunson vs DeCarlo Perez Middleweight Clash Set for Oct. 18th

image

Philadelphia, PA-Hidden beneath the publicity surrounding the NBCSN-televised twin main events on Saturday, Oct 18, is an intriguing eight-round middleweight match.

It features Tyrone Brunson, of Philadelphia, and DeCarlo Perez, of Atlantic City, NJ, in what figures to be an explosive contest at the 2300 Arena at 2300 South Swanson Street.    
 

image

  
The Brunson-Perez showdown will serve as the main preliminary contest to the doubleheader main event: Steve “USS” Cunningham, of Philadelphia, vs. Natu Visinia, Lakewood, CA, 10 rounds, heavyweights; Edner Cherry, Wauchula, FL, vs. Jerry Belmontes, Corpus Christi, TX, 10 rounds, lightweights. NBCSN will televise Cunningham-Visinia and Cherry-Belmontes on its popular Fight Night series beginning at 9pm (EST).
  
Brunson (above), 29, set some kind of record when he turned pro in 2005 and knocked out all of his first 19 opponents in one round. That streak ended in 2008 when Brunson was held to a six-round draw by Mexican Antonio Soriano in Canada.
 
Overall, Brunson is 22-2-1, 21 K0s, including a stoppage-first round, of course–in his last fight June 1over Jansel Mateo in the loser’s Dominican Republic backyard.   
  
Now managed by Mark Cipparone and trained by Sloan Harrison, Brunson appears ready to get his career jump-started again. Though he lives in Philadelphia and boxed there as an amateur, the Oct. 18 fight with Perez will mark Brunson’s firs pro fight there since his debut in 2005. Instead, he has boxed in Michigan, Indiana, Oklahoma, Texas, Connecticut, Texas, Canada, Dominican Republic and New Zealand.
  
“Fighting in my hometown means more to me than ever before,” Brunson said. “I have not fought in Philly since my pro debut at the Blue Horizon so I can’t wait to give my friends, family and fans the performance of a lifetime. I never realized that I would have this extra boost that I am feeling right now just because I will have my people there rooting for me. It is really special and I have been pumped up about the fight ever since it was offered to me. I can’t wait to make Philly proud of one of their own.
  
“I have found a team with the chemistry that I have been looking for my entire career. I recently signed with Mark Cipparone of Club 1957 Management. He has been making some noise in the Philly boxing market over the last two years. Crazy as it seems I now have a second chance because this feels like my pro debut all over again.”
  
Perez (below), 23, appears to be coming into his own, having won six of his last seven, dropping only an eight-round split decision to Wilky Campfort, of Ft. Lauderdale, FL, earlier this year in Atlantic City.     
 
A pro since 2010, Perez is 12-3-1, 4 K0s. In his last fight Aug. 2 in Atlantic City, he earned a six-round decision over Marcus Willis, of Ft. Myers, FL.
 
“I’ve been working hard in the gym but there still are a few things to fix,” Perez said. “I’ll be ready for anything Brunson brings. He may try to come out fast, like he does in most of his fights, or he may want to start slower and save something for the later rounds.”

image

Co-trainer Hassan Hameed-El: “This fight will prove what we already know-DeCarlo is one of the best middleweight prospects in the country. He should be in line for a regional title after this, certainly a spot among the Top 15 in the country. This fight reinforces what people have seen. DeCarlo has fought undefeated fighters, experienced fighters, tough fighters.”   
  
The Oct. 18 show includes a six-round all-Philadelphia lightweight contest between Victor Vasquez and Gerald Smith.
  
Vasquez, 31, is known as The Fighting Barber since he cuts hair when he is not boxing. A pro since 2006, Vasquez is 16-9-1, 7 K0s. He has not boxed since March 21 when he lost an unpopular eight-round decision to Osnel Charles, of Atlantic City, at Harrah’s Philadelphia.
  
This will mark Vasquez’ 10th pro fight in this building, formerly known as the New Alhambra, Arena and Asylum Arena. He is 7-2-1 there.
 
 
Smith, 29, also has been idle lately, last boxing March 29 when he dropped a four-round decision to Wellington Romero, a member of the Dominican Republic Olympic team, in Atlantic City. That was Smith’s first fight in six years; he is 3-1, 1 K0.
 
Three four-round fights complete the seven-bout card.