Super Bouts Throughout Boxing History

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By: Steve Gallegos

With the long anticipated mega fight between Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao just a day away, we are going to look back at some of the “Super” bouts throughout boxing history.

Marvin Hagler vs Thomas Hearns– During an era of 4 kings: Hagler, Leonard, Hearns and Duran, this was probably the best fight matchup made from the circle of these 4 legends. The 1st round was one of the best rounds in boxing history as Hearns came out throwing everything he had and rocked Hagler.. Hagler showed his grit as well as a very hard head and weathered the early onslaught. Hearns, who liked to end fights early, tried his best to get Hagler out early and broke his right hand in the process. After a bad cut on the forehead of Hagler, put the possibility of the fight coming to a close, Hagler went in for the kill and put Hearns down and out.
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Marvin Hagler vs “Sugar” Ray Leonard– Like Mayweather vs Pacquiao, this bout was the most anticipated fight in the 1980’s. Both men were superstars with contrasting styles and personalities. Leonard was the charismatic, fun loving hero and Hagler was the blue collar, all American Joe. After many years of waiting as well as many comebacks for Leonard, the fight finally took place in 1987. The fight wasn’t an all out slugfest as Leonard chose to box, move and not engage with Hagler. Hagler started off slow, choosing to fight in an orthodox position as compared to his southpaw style. Ray used the ring, threw flashy combinations and would flurry in the last 30 seconds of each round to try and steal the round. Hagler had his moments in the middle rounds; however this was Ray’s night as he fought a smart fight, won over the crowd and would win over the judges as he won a 12 round split decision.
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Mike Tyson vs Evander Holyfield– Mike Tyson was considered “The Baddest Man On The Planet” and very few fighters posed a threat to Tyson. After putting off a big payday against Evander Holyfield and electing to give a shot to a 42-1 underdog in James “Buster” Douglas, Tyson was knocked out in 10 rounds in Tokyo, Japan in February of 1990. Holyfied would then knock “Buster” out later on that year to claim the heavyweight title and a showdown between Tyson and Holyfield looked like a done deal. They were scheduled to meet in early 1992; however Tyson’s rape conviction would scrap the fight all together. After Tyson’s release from prison in 1995, he did claim 2 Heavyweight titles over obscure oppostion. Finally in November of 1996, the two met at the MGM Grand Garden in Las Vegas. Holyfield, who showed he wasn’t intimidated by Tyson fought a well strategized fight in which he kept the fight on the inside and didn’t let Tyson land his hard bombs. The end result was an 11th round TKO for Holyfield.
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Julio Cesar Chavez vs Oscar De La Hoya– It was the most anticipated bout since Hagler vs Leonard. You had the Mexican legend in Chavez who had ruled the 140 lb division for the 7 years and you had the Mexican-American Golden Boy moving up in weight, trying to win his 4th world title. It was a contrast of styles as Chavez was the all action banger and De La Hoya was an exciting boxer/puncher. They met in June of 1996 at the legendary outdoor arena at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas, NV. De La Hoya came out using his jab and immediately opened up a huge cut over Chavez’s right eye. The eye continued to bleed badly and in the 4th round, De La Hoya opened and began landing hard left-right combinations. Referee Joe Cortez called time to have the ringside doctor inspect the cut and the bout was stopped awarding De La Hoya the WBC Super Lightweight Championship.
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Muhammad Ali vs Joe Frazier– It was the fight dubbed as the “Fight Of The Century”. You had 2 undefeated Heavyweight Champions going against each other to see who was the best. Ali had been away from boxing for 3 1/2 years due to refusing induction into the Armed Forces. During Ali’s exile from boxing, a new heavyweight champion came along in “Smokin” Joe Frazier. Frazier; however didn’t garner the same respect as Ali did and many didn’t feel he was the true heavyweight champ. The 2 champions would meet in 1971 and they had the United States of America divided. It was a fight of many twists and turns and the most memorable moment of the fight happened in round 15 when Frazier landed a huge left hook that put Ali down. The end result was a 15 round unanimous decision win for Frazier.
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Sherman Williams Heads to Germany to Spar Wladimir Klitschko Ahead of Joseph Parker Bout

KEY WEST, Fla. (March 26, 2014) – Battle-tested Bahamian heavyweight Sherman “Tank” Williams (36-13-2, 19 KOs) is returning to Germany to spar three weeks with world heavyweight champion Wladimir Klitschko (61-3, 51 KOs) and then fight highly-touted New Zealand prospect “Explosive” Joseph Parker (7-0, 6 KOs) on April 26 in Oberhauser, Germany.

Williams vs. Parker will be on undercard of a K2 Promotions-presented event, headlined by Klitschko’s IBF, WBO, WBA Super and IBO title defense against WBO No. 1 ranked mandatory challenger Alex “The Lionheart” Leapai (30-4-3, 24 KOs).

The 5′ 11, 245-pound Williams serves as a perfect sparring partner for Klitschko, whose Apr. 26 opponent stands 6′ 0″ and weighs 245-pounds. Williams, who has fought twice before in Germany, losing decisions to Manuel Charr and former world champion Ruslan Chagaev, has sparred twice with Wladimir and six other times with Klitschko’s brother, recently retired world champion Vitali.

“Based on their (Klitschko brothers) sizes, around 6′ 6″,” Williams explained, “I give them a contrast in style when they’re fighting much shorter guys. I’m aggressive and stay low, so they work on angles to throws shots. I try to slip and jab to get inside against taller opponents. Wladimir is a decent, intelligent, laidback type guy. Outside of the ring he’s reserved. As a fighter, he’s a good technician and hard worker in the gym.

“Germany has been very good to me. In most of my European exploits, I’ve been embraced because they love my Bahamian flavor. They hear me start talking and I bring them happy feelings. I put a beating on Chageav over there, from pillar to post, and the fans ended-up behind me. I have built a solid, steady fan-base in Germany and I’ve been well received since my first trip there. I’m no stranger in Germany and those people know and like ‘Tank’ Williams very well.”

The 22-year-old Parker is 20 years Williams’ junior. He is a 6′ 4″, 230-pound Samoan who has fought only one opponent of note, an aging Frans Botha, who Parker stopped in the second round of their 2013 fight in New Zealand.

“He seems talented from the little I know,” Williams admitted. “I had never heard of him before I was offered this fight. He’s been pushed in New Zealand and Australia, on the fast track but he has never fought anybody like me. There’s nothing he can do that I haven’t seen before and I’m used to being the shorter guy. A lot of guys can talk the talk but we’ll find out if he can walk the walk. I’m bringing my ‘Conch’ punch (overhand right) and Parker is going to know he’s been in a fight.”

In addition to Charr and Chagaev, Williams has fought some of the best heavyweights in the world during the course of his 16 ½-year professional career, such as Evander Holyfield (NC3), Robert Helenius (LDEC10), Chauncy Welliver (WDEC12), Tye Fields (LDEC12), Taurus Sykes (LDEC10), Al Cole (WDEC10), Obed Sullivan (LDEC12), Jameel McCline (D10) and Robert Davis (LTKO5).

“This is a very exciting fight for Sherman,” Williams’ manager Si Stern added. “His experience will enable him to do very well against Parker. A victory can bring ‘Tank’ some excellent opportunities for some major fights around the world.”

In 292 rounds fought, Williams has been knockout only one time, by Davis. His relatively short stature in height, especially for a heavyweight, has been detrimental over the years in terms of him landing high profile fights “I’ve been in the gym since October but it isn’t easy for me to get fights,” Williams noted. “I had fights lined up with David Price and Tyson Fury; they wouldn’t fight me, saying I was too short. I guess they wouldn’t have fought Joe Frazier, Mike Tyson or David Tua.

“The opportunity to fight this kid (Parker) came up. Hey, I’d fight anybody if the right opportunity comes up. This could spring me into something else. I always come to fight.”

Czar Glazkov: The New Giant Killer?

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TOTOWA, NJ (February 12, 2013) – Casual boxing fans might look at the heavyweight division today and think that to be a champion a boxer must be pushing seven feet tall. However hardcore enthusiasts understand that size isn’t the only quality that matters in boxing’s biggest division. In fact, many fight followers will tell you that the average-sized big men are the real killers among heavyweights.  
 

There’s an old adage of the sport that states, “The bigger they are, the harder they fall”. Until recently, this saying certainly was the case. Throughout the history of boxing, some of the heavyweights with the biggest reputations were not in the same league, height-wise, as the current crop of boxing behemoths.

Ring kings like Joe Louis, Sonny Liston and Larry Holmes all barely broke the six-foot mark, while Mike Tyson, Rocky Marciano, and Joe Frazier were less than six feet tall. Evander Holyfield, always considered relatively small, ruled the heavyweight roost after moving up from the cruiserweight division. Holyfield not only gathered titles and monster paydays during the 1990s, he saved a slumping heavyweight division at a time when giants like George Foreman, Riddick Bowe and Buster Douglas roamed the earth.

Today is no different. Although the biggest-ever heavyweights in history are currently in charge of the weight class, the boxing world shouldn’t look for someone bigger to defeat them. The new savior of the division just has to be better.  

Kathy Duva, Main Events CEO, recalls, “When Holyfield fought Douglas, all but one boxing writer from Evander’s home town picked Douglas to win the fight because he was so much bigger. As we all remember, Evander knocked the bigger man out in the third round to win the heavyweight title that night-a title which he defended successfully against many bigger men. As Evander said and went on to prove many times, ‘It’s not the size of the man that matters. It’s the size of his heart.'”

Next week one of the emerging young lions among heavyweights, Czar Glazkov, 14-0, 10 KOs, brings his exciting, hard-punching style to the Paramount Theatre in Huntington, NY on February 23rd. Czar takes on Malik Scott, 35-0, 12 KOs, in the 10-round main event of the latest edition of FIGHT NIGHT on NBC Sports Network. The telecast begins at 10:30PM ET.

At 6’ 3″, Czar is a “smaller” heavyweight, compared to the dominant Klitschko brothers who currently reside at the top of the heap. However, Glazkov brings a devastating punch and a crowd-pleasing style that could make him a true star of the sport.

Of course, he’ll first have to handle Scott, an undefeated Philadelphian, before moving up in the rankings, but Czar has the credentials to do it. He was an accomplished amateur who won numerous international titles before building his undefeated streak as a pro.

In his last outing, Czar halted the touted prospect Tor Hamer after just four rounds. The impressive win on national TV earned Glazkov a legion of new fans that began buzzing that he might be the one to inject new blood into the sagging heavyweight division. With a little more seasoning and a few choice opportunities, Czar very well may prove himself to be another “Giant Destroyer”, just like Holyfield.