2016 Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada,  Pernell Whitaker Former Lightweight and Welterweight World Champion honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

The Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame held their annual ceremony this weekend. They honored fighters from the past how had memorable fight in Nevada, inducting them in the hall of fame and named Badou Jack as the Nevada “Fighter of the Year”.

 

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Pernell Whitaker Former Lightweight and Welterweight World Champion honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Pernell Whitaker Former Lightweight and Welterweight World Champion honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

Pernell Whitaker was among this years inductees. Whitaker was a three division champion and a 1984 Olympic Gold medalist. He fought multiple time in Nevada facing the likes of  Oscar De La Hoya, Rafael Pineda and Azumah Nelson. Whitaker is now Las Vegas resident and is trainer who has worked with the likes of Zab Judah.

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Pernell Whitaker former Lightweight and Welterweight World Champion honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Pernell Whitaker former Lightweight and Welterweight World Champion honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

 

 

 

Riddick Bowe the former lineal hightweight champion earned his spot in the hall of fame. “Big Daddy” went 43-1-1 during his nearly twenty year professional career which came after him winning a sliver medal at the 1988 Seoul, Korea Olympic games. Bowe is mostly know in Nevada boxing luster for the “Fan Man” fight against Evander Holyfield in 1993 at Caesars Palace. This is where a paraglider flew in to the ring in the seventh round and causing madness in and around the ring, in one of the most bizarre moments in boxing history.

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Riddick Bowe honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. Standing with Sugar Ray Leonard

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Riddick Bowe honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. Standing with Sugar Ray Leonard

 

 

One of the most famed female boxers of all times, Christy Martin was honor. She help women’s boxing from novelty act to legit sport. Martin would often steal the show in Nevada when she would be feature on under card of likes of Mike Tyson, Felix Trinidad and Julio Cesar Chavez Sr. With 31 career KO win, Christy Martin was always pure entertainment when she hit the ring.

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Christy MartinFormer Women Welterweight World Champion honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Christy MartinFormer Women Welterweight World Champion honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

 

 

Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini was among the inductees. Ray had a nice two year run in the 1980’s where he was the lightweight champion and made a bulk of his defense in Nevada during that time. Sadly that reign was mired by his bout at Caesar Palace in 1982 against Deul-koo Kim. Mancini would win the brutal fight in the 14th round via KO, but Kim would die days later after the fight from a subdural hematoma  suffered in the fight.

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony standing with Rich Marotta, President of the NVBHOF

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini honored at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony standing with Rich Marotta, President of the NVBHOF

 

 

The big winner of the night was current WBC Supper Middleweight Champion Badou Jack. He took home the honor of the Nevada Fighter of the Year, an award that has only been held by Floyd Mayweather since it’s creation in 2013. The Swedish import is now a Nevada resident, training out of the Mayweather Boxing Club and promoted by Floyd Mayweather himself as part of Mayweather Promotions. Over the past year “The Ripper” burst in to the forefront in the 168 lb division winning the WBC title over Anthony Dirrell and making two successful title defenses. On the horizon for him later this year is a unification bout with James DeGale, a win there would put him right back in the running to win fighter of the year next year.

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Badou Jack on the red carpet at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

30 July 2016, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, Badou Jack on the red carpet at the 4th Annual Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

 

All Photos Courtesy of Ken Howard of KenHowardImages.com  and The Title Fight

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lennox Lewis to be Inducted Into Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame Aug. 8th

LAS VEGAS, NV. — Superstar heavyweight LENNOX LEWIS, the last undisputed heavyweight champion and who won an Olympic gold medal with a victory over Riddick Bowe and scored professional victories over boxing legends such as Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield and Vitali Klitschko, confirmed Wednesday that he will return to Las Vegas this weekend to attend the Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame’s third annual induction gala at Caesars Palace on Saturday, August 8.
 
Lewis is the latest in a gaggle of stars who have announced they’ll attend the popular gala induction ceremony.  In addition to Lewis the Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame has confirmed that Marvelous Marvin Hagler, Felix Trinidad, Marco Antonio Barrera, Eddie Mustafa Muhammad and Roger Mayweather will also attend the high-profile event as the newest members of the Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame.
 
Lewis, who was 41-2-1 with 32 knockouts and had a win over every man he ever faced in the ring, is one of the headliners of the NVBHOF’s 2015 class of inductees, chosen in the non-Nevada boxer category.
 
Lewis avenged the only two losses of his career, stopping both Oliver McCall and Hasim Rahman after losing to them earlier.
 
Lewis was a classic boxer with a powerful punch.  He’s probably best known for his 2002 win over Tyson, where he won every round before stopping him in the eighth round.
 
He held all, or a version of, the heavyweight title from 1993 until 1994 and then again from 1997 through the end of his career in 2003
 
Lewis had great success in Nevada and avenged both of his losses in Las Vegas. He was 8-0 in his Nevada career and won fights at both Caesars Palace and Caesars Tahoe.
 
In the latter part of his fighting career, Lewis joined HBO Sports as an expert analyst and was a familiar figure at ringside for many of the biggest bouts of the late 20th and early 21st century in Las Vegas.
 
The Hall was founded by noted boxing broadcaster Rich Marotta. Its chief operating officer is Michelle Corrales-Lewis, whose late husband, Diego Corrales, was an inaugural inductee into the Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame. For more information, phone 702-3-NVBHOF, or 702-368-2463.
 
Groupe Yvon Michel (GYM), in association with Global Legacy Boxing (GLB) and Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment (MLSE), made an official announcement this week, along with Lennox Lewis, that Light Heavyweight World Champion Adonis “Superman” Stevenson will defend his titles against Tommy “Kryptonite” Karpency on Sept. 11 at Toronto’ Ricoh Coliseum in “The Revival: “KO in TO”.
 
The upcoming World Championship title fight card will also see Canadian Heavyweight Champ Dillon “Big Country” Carman defend his title against legendary Donovan “Razor” Ruddock.
 
Global Legacy President Les Woods s, :”I am so pleased to see The Champ, Lennox Lewis, recognized by the Nevada Boxing Hall of Fame. It’s a privilege and honor to call him my friend and to be a partner teamed with him in Toronto to promote Boxing in Canada.”

Photos: Deontay Wilder Captures Heavyweight Championship Over Bermane Stiverne

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Esther Lin/SHOWTIME

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Hoganphotos/Golden Boy Promotions

 

LAS VEGAS (Jan. 17, 2015) – And the new WBC Heavyweight World Champion…

 

America finally has its heavyweight world champion as Alabama’s Deontay Wilder dethroned defending championBermane Stiverne via unanimous decision (118-109, 119-108, 120-107) Saturday on SHOWTIME® from theMGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.

 

Wilder (33-0, 32 KOs), who had never fought past the fourth round and had knocked out all 32 of his professional opponents, boxed brilliantly behind a stellar jab to become the first U.S.-born heavyweight champion in nearly a decade.  The towering 6-foot-7 Tuscaloosa native capitalized on his reach advantage, jabbing consistently to set up a powerful straight right. 

 

Fighting on Hall of Famer Muhammad Ali’s 73rd birthday, Wilder became the first undefeated American heavyweight champion since Riddick Bowe in 1992 and the first American champion since Shannon Briggs won the crown in 2006. 

 

“I’m just excited and happy to bring this belt back to America,” Wilder said.  “It’s going to mean a lot. I think I answered a lot of questions tonight.  We knew we could go 12 rounds.  We knew we could take a punch.  We knew we could do it.”

 

Heading into the first heavyweight championship fight at MGM Grand since the infamous Mike Tyson-Evander Holyfield ear bite in 1997, there were questions from boxing insiders if Wilder, who had never been truly tested, could handle the power of a true heavyweight and last in the later rounds.  But Wilder answered those questions with a disciplined game plan, landing more than double the total punches and throwing 420 jabs to Stiverne’s 139. 

 

“When I saw he could take a great punch we knew we were in for the long run.  Twelve rounds is nothing.  I want to bring excitement back to the heavyweight division.  Whoever is ready, I’m ready.”

 

Stiverne (24-2-1, 21 KOs) was able to stagger Wilder with a few shots, but he did not throw enough jabs or cut off the ring effectively.  Wilder was allowed to circle the ring and pop his jab at will.  Stiverne landed just 39 jabs compared to Wilder’s 120. 

 

“It wasn’t my night,” Stiverne said.  “I felt 100 percent before the fight but once I got in the ring I couldn’t cut the ring, I couldn’t move my head like I usually do.  What can I say?  Congrats to him.

 

“I knew I was trying to throw combos of four or five punches and I could only throw two of them.  I just felt like I was flat in the ring.  What I know I could do I didn’t do.  I just have to go back and learn from my mistakes and find out what happened tonight.”

 

WBC Super Bantamweight World Champion Leo Santa Cruz defended his crown for the fourth time with an eighth-round TKO of Jesus Ruiz and afterword called out fellow champions Abner Mares and Guillermo Rigondeaux in the co-feature of SHOWTIME CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING. 

 

The early rounds were close and competitive and Ruiz, a heavy underdog, seemed to be a tougher test than he looked on paper.  But it was clear that Santa Cruz was landing the cleaner shaper punches.  The former bantamweight world champion landed some meaningful shots and had Ruiz in trouble in the seventh and, for the first time, it appeared that he could finish Ruiz.

 

Santa Cruz (29-0-1, 17 KOs) came out blazing in the eighth, landed a big right cross to kick off the round and continued to tee-off on the challenger.  In trouble against the ropes and not fighting back, referee Kenny Bayless jumped in and stopped the bout with Ruiz (32-6-5, 21 KOs) still on his feet at :29 of the eighth round.  The champion landed 43 percent of his total punches and nearly 50 percent of his power punches, while landing an impressive 73 power shots to the body. 

 

“Like I expected, it was a war,” Santa Cruz said.  “He came prepared.  We hurt him and we didn’t let the chance go away.  We kept going after him and we stopped him.  I hurt him with the right hand.  I knew he was hurt so I went after him.  I knew Kenny Bayless would stop it because he wasn’t throwing punches.

 

 “I want the best and I want to please the fans.  I want (Abner) Mares, I want (Guillermo) Rigondeaux. Hopefully our next fight is against one of the best.”

 

Ruiz, who only landed 22 percent of his total punches, disagreed with the stoppage. 

 

“I want a rematch,” Ruiz said.  “I don’t feel they should have stopped the fight, but I have to accept it.  But I’m fine.  Look at me – I’m not cut. He didn’t even drop me.”

 

In the opening bout of the SHOWTIME CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING telecast, undefeated super lightweight Amir Imam floored Fidel Maldonado Jr. four times and scored a fifth-round TKO in a brawl that featured five total knockdowns. 

 

Maldonado was the busier fighter, but Imam floored the Albuquerque resident for the fourth time in his career with a short right just a moment before the bell rang to end the second.  Then, in an early candidate for Round of the Year that featured three knockdowns, Maldonado responded by knocking down Imam for the first time in his career 30 seconds into the third with a solid straight left.  Imam bounced back and sent Maldonado to the canvas with a huge right with 20 seconds left in the third and then again with a straight right as part of a vicious attack with less than 10 seconds left in the round. 

 

The action continued and Imam (16-0, 14 KOs) floored Maldonado for the fourth time in the fight with a short right followed by a left hook just seconds before the bell to close the fifth.  Maldonado (19-3, 16 KOs) got up but was wobbling and referee Robert Byrd halted the contest at 2:59.  Imam’s power was the difference, landing 50 percent of his power shots. 

 

“It was a tough knockdown, but champions get up and finish the fight hard and that’s what I did,” Imam said.  “I just had to stay composed and do what I had to do.  “I started timing him.  When I hit him with that good shot he was out.  I could see it.  That was the rope-a-dope.  I was swinging for the fences and that was it, baby. 

 

“I’m ready for the title shot right now.  I just want to fight for the title.” 

 

Four of the five knockdowns occurred with less than 30 seconds left in each round.  After the fight, Maldonado admitted that he simply failed to protect himself when the rounds were winding down.. 

 

“I just got caught with a couple of punches,” Maldonado said.  “He kept his composure and he came out with the W.  I just got caught.  I got lazy in there and he capitalized.  He was the better man tonight.  I got kind of bored at the end of the rounds and I paid for it.”

 

In the main event of SHOWTIME BOXING on SHO EXTREME, undefeated light heavyweight prospect Vyacheslav Shabranskyy (12-0, 10 KOs) kept his perfect record intact with a thoroughly convincing TKO victory of Garrett Wilson (13-9-1, 7 KOs). 

 

Shabranskyy kept his distance and was very effective; landing 48 percent of his power shot and threw more than 60 punches in each round.  The Ukrainian prospect scored a knockdown with a right in the closing seconds of the second and another with a clean right in the final 10 seconds of the eighth, sending Wilson face first to the canvas.  Wilson beat the count but was saved by the bell as Shabranskyy unloaded more than a dozen consecutive punches. 

 

The durable Wilson took a tremendous beating in the ninth and seemingly didn’t land a punch, forcing referee Jay Nady to stop the bout after the ninth upon suggestion of the ringside physician.

 

In the opening bout of the SHO EXTREME telecast, heavyweight Eric Molina (23-2, 17 KOs) defeated Raphael Zumbano (32-9-1, 25 KOs) via eighth round TKO in a one-sided affair.

 

Molina, who landed 76 percent of his power shots and more than 50 percent of his total punches, was connecting at will when referee Russell Mora halted the contest at 1:28 of the eighth. 

 

In a non-televised swing bout, Cesar Quiñonez (1-0, 1 KO), a Las Vegas native and the first fighter to go professional from Fernando Vargas’ gym Feroz Fight Factory, made his professional debut and scored a knockout win over Chula Vista’s Joan Valenzuela (1-2) in the second round at 2:13.